Research

Research Projects

A key objective of the 2014–2016 AMES Australia Strategic Plan is to provide credible evidence to inform Government and others on policies and practices which impact on the settlement outcomes of refugees and migrants. Working in partnership with AMES Australia service delivery divisions, the Research and Policy team lead policy development and policy responses, preparation of major tenders, contribute to AMES Australia strategic and annual planning and undertake research projects.

The research focus has two purposes. Projects inform service developments and contribute to improving service delivery within AMES Australia. Projects also allow AMES Australia to document and analyse successful practice and contribute to the evidence base required for dialogue with key stakeholders and government and contribute to policy development.

Our research projects are outlined below:

Vocational Training for New Migrants: A Pathway into Carework

26 July 2017

This report provides an analysis of the employment outcomes and post-course activities of 203 AMES Australia clients who participated in the Certificate III in Individual Support and Certificate III in Early Childhood Education & Care courses in 2014-15.

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Transitions to employment and education for new migrants at AMES Australia

This report provides findings and analysis of a research project that examined the employment and further education outcomes and experiences of 460 former AMES Australia clients who had completed the SLPET program in 2014-15.

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The light on the hill: Perceptions and attitudes towards private sponsorship of refugees in Australia

1 April 2017

This report provides preliminary answers to questions regarding the capacity and interest of organisations from the business, volunteer, community services and local government sectors in engaging with the Community Support Program (CSP).

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In transition: Employment outcomes of clients who completed vocational training at AMES Australia

The report details key findings about the employment outcomes and experiences of vocational training (Certificate III in Individual Support and in Early Childhood Education and Care) clients at AMES Australia, six months after they completed the course.

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In Transition: Employment outcomes of migrants in English language learning programs

This report provides an overview of the employment outcomes of Settlement Language Pathways to Employment and Training (SLPET) program clients six months after they completed the course at AMES Australia.

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Violence against women in CALD communities

This report is based on community consultation and research and identifies issues to be considered and recommends future actions when working with CALD communities to prevent violence against women.

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AMES Australia Migrants and Food Survey

22 April 2016

This study is based on a short survey of new arrivals undertaking the Adult Migrant English Program at AMES Australia. It details respondents’ changes in dietary habits since coming to Australia.

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Hidden Assets: Partner-migration, skilled women and the Australian workforce

29 February 2016

This report contains the findings of a national study into the employment experience of women “partner migrants” in Australia. It focuses on their experiences of finding work, employer perspectives and best practice in assisting skilled migrants find jobs

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Volunteer and Social Connections Report

16 December 2015

This report details the findings of a survey of almost 400 people undertaking the Adult Migrant Education Program (AMEP). It describes how newly arrived migrants connect to their local community and contribute to society through volunteering.

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Finding Satisfying Work

2 November 2015

This research documents the employment situations of a group of recent migrants with low English level from different occupational backgrounds. It explores the work they were doing, how satisfied they were and what factors influenced their satisfaction.

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